Quiet Assurance

I’m using my “read through the Bible in a year” schedule to select passages on which to preach each Sunday. I’ve been trying to rotate between the three sections – Psalms, Old Testament, and New Testament. So far this year has been mostly bouncing between the Old and New Testament readings, but I have a bunch of passages to preach from the Psalms in the second half of the year (my reading schedule calls for a reading of the Psalms twice each year.) This Sunday, however, the Psalm reading won out.

I will be preaching specifically on Psalm 46. Notice how this Psalm ends –

Be still, and know that I am God. I will be exalted among the nations,
I will be exalted in the earth!
The LORD of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our fortress (Ps. 46:10-11, ESV)

Have you ever noticed with what a quiet calm so many of the biblical writers faced their greatest fears and calamities? Now, to be sure there are many passages which speak of anxiety and concern. But, just off the top of my head these other passages came to mind as I was thinking about Psalm 46 –

But I have calmed and quieted my soul, like a weaned child with its mother; like a weaned child is my soul within me. (Psalm 131:2)

Though the fig tree should not blossom, nor fruit be on the vines,
the produce of the olive fail and the fields yield no food,
the flock be cut off from the fold and there be no herd in the stalls,
Yet I will rejoice in the LORD; I will take joy in the God of my salvation.
God, the LORD, is my strength; he makes my feet like the deer’s;
he makes me tread on my high places. (Habakkuk 3:17-19)

Such faith, such calmness, such beautiful literature!

We are truly living in unsettled times – our culture, our morality, our very democracy is being shaken to its roots. What can we do – to whom and to where do we turn?

I lift up my eyes to the hills. From where does my help come?
My help comes from the LORD, who made heaven and earth.
He will not let your foot be moved; he who keeps you will not slumber.
Behold, he who keeps Israel will neither slumber nor sleep.
The LORD is your keeper; the LORD is your shade on your right hand.
The sun shall not strike you by day, nor the moon by night.
The LORD will keep you from all evil; he will keep your life.
The LORD will keep your going out and your coming in from this time forth and forevermore. (Psalm 121)

I have to honestly admit a sense of fear about the future. I fear for my daughter, and for the generation her generation will raise. When our government tells us that men have to be allowed into women’s restrooms, when high school girls have to sue the state of Connecticut in order to be allowed to compete in track events without the presence of male competitors, when presidential candidates openly promote abortion until the very moment of birth – and when a presidential candidate shamelessly promotes his marriage to his “husband,” I have to ask, “Where will it stop?” And, how did we get to this point anyway?

I think I was born without an optimism bone, or muscle. I am Captain Pessimism. Maybe Admiral Pessimism might be more accurate. So, in days like today, in times like these, I really need to hear these passages from the Psalms and Habakkuk.

I think I’m going to be preaching to myself this Sunday. All others are welcome to eavesdrop, if you wish.

Whew, What a Week (Theology speaks to current events)

Wow. What an interesting week. It started with the revelation that filthy rich, leftist cultural elites can actually act like the filthy rich, rightest cultural elites and game the system to their advantage. In this particular case it was a group of parents who paid stupefying amounts of money to bribe officials and to pay for “ringers” to take college entrance exams so that their children could gain entrance to cultural elitist colleges and universities. Its funny – I thought one point of a liberal arts university education was the formation of character. Oh, well. I digress.

The week ended with a display of political hypocrisy so staggering that it defies description. I was led to believe, and have had it preached to me for nigh onto 6 decades, that the Republican party was the party of the Constitution, that what Republicans wanted more than anything was to get government off our backs and to get good, solid, “constitutional conservatives” appointed to the Supreme Court. So, when it really came down to a vote where Republican senators could actually act on these core principles, what did they do? Well, 12 senators did stand up for those values. The others? They followed the petulant little toddler in the White House like so many lemmings right off the cliff of constitutional mayhem.

As an aside – I hope that when a Democratic President decides that there is a national emergency regarding the ownership of firearms, that these Republicans remember March 14, 2019.

Make no mistake – the president of the United States has the power to declare a national emergency – a cowardly congress gave the executive office that power back in 1976 I believe. Since that time there have been 50+ declarations of such emergencies, many of which are routinely extended, even when the party in the oval office changes hands.

In those 50+ national emergencies not one, not one single time, has there been an “emergency” that was declared that appropriated funds that TWO separate sessions of congress have refused to give the president. Never, not once, has there been a president who failed to get his agenda passed by his own party, and then shut down the government only to get his agenda rejected by an opposing party, then gone on to declare a national emergency in order to fulfill a campaign promise.

Yet, the overwhelming majority of Republican senators refuses to accept this basic, fundamental, constitutional struggle and have blindly followed their leader – all because they fear his wrath in upcoming elections.

I could go on about the Democrats suddenly discovering that there actually IS a constitution, but it’s no fun shooting fish in a barrel.

So, I was reading along in Psalms this week, and serendipitously happened upon this verse:

Those of low estate are but a breath; those of high estate are a delusion; in the balances they go up; they are together lighter than a breath. Put no trust in extortion; set no vain hopes on robbery; if riches increase, set not your heart on them. (Psalm 62:9-10)

That got me to thinking – and these verses also speak to today –

Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the LORD our God. (Psalm 20:7)

Woe to those who go down to Egypt for help and rely on horses, who trust in chariots because they are many and in horsemen because they are very strong, but do not look to the Holy One of Israel or consult the LORD! . . . The Egyptians are man, and not God, and their horses are flesh, and not spirit. When the LORD stretches out his hand, the helper will stumble, and he who is helped will fall, and they will all perish  together. (Isaiah 31:1, 3)

It doesn’t matter who you put your trust in if they are humans – the rich and famous (from the right or the left), in Republican senators or Democratic senators or the president or some black robed justice of the Supreme Court. God holds them all in derision, and all who trust in them will be crushed.

Why can’t Christians learn that??

Undeniable Truths of Theological Reflection (#3)

Continuing my series on my “Undeniable Truths for Theological Reflection” . . .

Building on truth #2, if the authors of Scripture intended their writings to be understood (for me that is axiomatic), then they also intended their writings to achieve their intended purpose:

3.  The authors of the Bible expected their message to create its original intended purpose. This purpose might be encouragement, exhortation, obedience, etc.

Here again, the casual and non-observant reader would glance at these sentences and say, “sure, no problem” and then go out and violate the meaning that I intended for them (pardon the irony).

What I am trying to say is that if a writer composed a narrative, he (or she, but most authors/scribes in antiquity were males) intended his narrative to convey the truth of the narrative (historical truth, didactic teaching, command, parable). If he composed a poem, he intended the poem to convey its intended purpose (comfort, frustration, lament, confession, rejoicing). If he composed in the wisdom tradition, he intended his writing to convey some aspect of wisdom. Point is, when we take a piece of poetry and turn it into a piece of history, or even worse yet, a command, we violate the meaning of Scripture. Let that last little phrase sink in. We can love Scripture, quote Scripture, memorize Scripture; but if we misinterpret or misapply Scripture, we are violating the meaning of that Scripture!

To take a well-worn, but never-the-less powerful example, look at Genesis 1-3. Nothing about this text indicates that it is a lesson in history, biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, genetics, or anthropology. Yet, I have seen, and heard, Genesis 1-3 used as a text to explain all of these, if not more. That is to violate the meaning of Genesis 1-3! If I can boil the meaning of Genesis 1-3 down to one sentence, it would be this: Genesis 1-3 is a narrative story, set in a poetic structure, that explains (1) who God is, and (2) who man (male and female) is, and (3) what the relationship is between God and man, God and creation, and man and creation. Anything beyond that is pure speculation, and the more specific the speculation the more harmful the results.

However, the same can be said of the historical sections of the Old Testament (they are not written to be examples in ethics courses), the Psalms (written from man to God, not God to man), the wisdom literature  and, in the New Testament, the parables (not cute little stories for VBS) and (my pet peeve) the book of Revelation (not a “road map to history”).

Undeniable truth for theological reflection number 3 teaches us that before we can say “this is what the Scripture says to us” we have to ask the question, “what kind of Scripture is this?” Then, once we have determined the kind of Scripture we are dealing with, then we can begin to work on determining its purpose, and for us, its intended meaning.