Bible Reading Schedules Now Posted

Every year for the past several years I have posted “Bible Reading Schedules” that will allow you to read the Bible through either once or twice in a given year. The schedules for 2020 are now posted on their separate pages.

If you are familiar with these schedules, they are identical to past years. If you have never seen one of my schedules, a few notes are in order. One, you will notice that there is no reading for Sundays. I assume you will be attending a church service, and for that day I am also making the assumption that you will be provided with a text (or two) in the sermon and/or in your Bible class for you to read and to meditate upon for that day. Alternatively, you can use the lectionary reading(s) for that Sunday – something that I do in my own daily reading. (These are available in a number of sources – either print or on-line. Search for “Common Lectionary Readings.” Note that the liturgical year begins in December with Advent. There are three years of lectionary readings, and you will want to be sure you are reading for the appropriate year, either “A”, “B”, or “C.”

You will also notice that for the “Read the Bible Through Once” schedule, there is only a reading for the Psalms on Saturday. This will allow you to “make up” on Saturday for any days that you missed during that week.

In the “Read the Bible Through Twice” you will see that on Mondays and Saturdays there is only one chapter of the New Testament, and on all other days there are 2. There are always 5 chapters of the Old Testament.

In both schedules the Psalms are read through twice. This allows a constant presence in the praise, lament, and worship literature of the Israelites and the early church.

I guess it should go without saying, but any schedule that keeps you in God’s Word is a good one. Some individuals like to read slowly – taking several years to work through the Bible. Some prefer a chronological approach – attempting to place the books in the order in which they were written (to the best of our knowledge). Some prefer reading schedules such as the Moravian Brethren produce – and I have used those schedules and like them very much. (Search for “Moravian Brethren” on the internet. They have a number of different editions for you to choose from). These schedules posted here are just my attempt to work out a schedule to keep myself (and any others who are interested) in the text. Use them if they are useful, lose them if they are not.

Whatever schedule you prefer, the important thing is that we keep our hearts and minds in the text of God’s Word, and that we seek to apply his guidance in our daily lives.

Blessings on your study in 2020! Let us all ascend by climbing lower.

New Bible Reading Schedules (Pages) Posted

I have uploaded two Bible reading schedules for 2019. The first is my preferred reading schedule (at least for ministers) as it calls for the reading of the Bible twice in its entirety each year. As I state on that page, I use this to read the Bible once in a more formal (literal, or word-for-word) translation, and once from a more dynamic (or thought-for-thought) translation. This way I “hear” the text in different ways each year.

This year I added a second schedule for those who do not have the time or the inclination to read the Bible through twice. However, the format is very similar, in that each day a Psalm is read, as is a section of the Old Testament and a section of the New Testament. This allows us to “hear” as the word might be, the Word of God to the Israelites and the Word of God to the new Israel, the church.

You will note that there is no reading in either schedule for Sunday. For my own study, I use the Revised Common Lectionary reading for that given Sunday, and for those who are not preachers or Bible School teachers, I would hope (and assume!) that you will be in a worship assembly where a passage of the Bible is read and studied. So, on Sunday, your local congregation becomes the source of your daily Bible Reading.

Each page has a brief explanation of that reading schedule, but you may have further questions, or, perish the thought, you might find a typo or some other problem with one or the other (or both) of the schedules. Please attach a comment if you find a mistake, so I can alert others. Even as long as I have been doing this, I still find mistakes from time to time (last year I left out an entire 5 chapter section of an Old Testament book!)

Thanks for reading this blog, and I hope that one (or both) of these schedules is a blessing to you.