A Serious Question – Who Influences You?

I just read an advertisement about a book that sounded interesting to me – until I read down to the obligatory “praise” section where the reviews of well-known authors or preachers are prominently displayed. I looked at the names of the first two fawning minions and decided, nope, that book was not for me, regardless of how interesting the content of the book first appeared.

Am I alone in my estimation that if a book is praised by someone with whom I have absolutely nothing in common, then I will probably not like the book? I mean, on one hand that sounds so churlish, so immature. I do not even like the way it sounds, and I’m the one who feels that way.

On the other hand, Jesus taught that the way we know what is in a person’s heart is by examining the fruit of their life. The fruit of an author’s life includes (although is not limited to) his or her books. The fruit of a preacher’s life includes (although is not limited to) what he proclaims as the word of God, and what he publicly approves of.

If an author or preacher rejects the biblical teaching regarding sexuality and marriage, if he or she rejects the biblical teaching regarding salvation or sanctification, if he or she approaches the Scriptures from a point of view 180 degrees opposite of my understanding of the inspiration of Scripture – how can I then take his or her word regarding the value of a book and use that affirmation to go out and buy that book?

I totally get that in the book marketing business, reviewers are chosen in proportion to their share of the book selling market. I genuinely do not want to avoid or reject a quality piece of writing just because the publisher invited some doofus to review the book and give some patronizing applause in order to sell a few hundred more copies.

I do not want to drop any names here (because I could list quite a few), but I do read reviews and promotions carefully, and if the preponderance of the acclaim comes from on particular stream of moral or theological understanding, then I can rest assured that the content of the book will not be something that I want to waste my time on. Likewise, if I read a review or a positive advertisement from someone I trust to be a serious student of the word, even if I disagree with that person on certain points, I am more willing to buy that book.

Anyway, this might just be me, and you may buy your books based on an entirely different set of criteria.

How do you select your books? And, how do you decide if you will purchase a book especially if you are not familiar with the author, and are equally unfamiliar with the quality of the reviewers?

Don’t Read That Book!

I did something today that I never thought I would do. It was so out of character that I feel dizzy. It was so out of character that I am looking around for Rod Serling. I think I may need to go lie down for a while.

What was my crime, my despicable act of self-renunciation? I threw a book away before I finished reading it. I was not even half-way through reading it. I was duped into thinking it was worth my money and my time. I have been violated. I wasted both time and precious money on something that was worth neither. Oh, the humanity.

The experience has left me seriously jaded. Usually I can sniff through all the hype and advertising that accompanies new book promotions. For some reason this one slipped through my radar. But, whatever does not kill you makes you stronger (or so the saying goes), and you can bet I will not soon be so gullible. The experience also got me to thinking about the money we spend on books (and, perhaps even to a greater extent, movies), so I thought I would pass along some helpful hints from my sorely bruised ego.

Don’t buy, or read, a book just because a lot of people have bought, or read, the book. The Book of Mormon and The Shack have both sold millions of copies – and neither is worth the paper it is printed on. There are plenty of good books in the fiction category. Don’t fill your mind with trash.

Don’t buy, or read, a book just because it is published by a major, reputable publishing firm. This is usually a good barrier against literary riffraff, but this is where I got sucker-punched. If possible, pay attention to who is endorsing a book (these days, no book is published without a half-dozen or more “celebrity” endorsements). There are some names that telegraph to me that the book is solid gold – and there are some names that if I see them attached to a book, I know it is solid waste landfill material.

Don’t buy or read a book just because a “popular” writer has his/her name attached. It is a dirty little secret in the book printing business, but ghost-writers abound, and you would probably be surprised at how many really well known “authors” are just as curious at what is written in a book that has their name on it as you are. They may give a brief outline, and they may read it first and offer some suggestions and fine-tune some points, but they are not the “author” as much as the “approver.”

You may be curious as to the title and/or author of the book I threw away. Well, I am not going to give the book or the author the free advertisement. For me to throw a book away, especially in the middle of reading it, should be enough to let you know it was awful.

My theme in this blog is “ascending lower.” One of my major theses is that we can never climb higher unless we are willing to subject ourselves, to go lower, and to allow others to teach us. I do not want to change that, but at the same time, it must be emphatically stated that there must be a limit to our self-limitation. We cannot expose ourselves to garbage without smelling like garbage. We cannot expose our mind to literary junk and hope that somehow we can transform it into a piece of art.

Let us always choose the path of submission, of willingly choosing to go lower. But, please, for the sake of everything that is good and holy and beautiful, do not fill your mind with trash!