The Measure of Greatness

Kinda, sorta, following up on my thoughts yesterday (all of this got all jumbled up in my mind and so if it seems disjointed, it probably is).

When I think of the truly gigantic people in my life, and when I think of what makes them truly gigantic, a number of qualities come to mind. Most are brilliant – although not a few of them have no formal or higher education. “Brilliant” is relative, and some of the most brilliant people in my life have either never attended college, or have little college education. A number of my heroes are acclaimed theologians and church historians, as that is the field where I have spent most of my life, but I could also share the names of a couple of pilots, a book store owner, a couple of preachers, and a number of Bible school teachers.

But the one quality that all of these individuals share (well, almost all) is one that cannot be bought, studied, or manipulated. It is the quality of humility. What strikes me about the list of my “great cloud of witnesses” is the fact that almost to a person, they would be embarrassed to be included on such a list.

I can illustrate this best by highlighting those who would be considered by a majority of people as being at the top of their respective fields. These are men who are scholars among scholars. The list of books and articles in peer-reviewed journals they have published is astounding. They command respect from their peers, and even (if not especially) from those who disagree with them. You can disrespect a pusillanimous little poseur, but when a scholar is singled out by an opponent as having an argument that seriously challenges his view and must then be addressed, you know the aforementioned scholar is worthy of his stripes.

I have studied under a number of these scholar/saints, and beyond the information and training they provided, they demonstrated a grasp of humility that defies description. They chose their words from an infinite vault of silence – the silence that comes from the mastery of a subject and the wisdom to know how much of that mastery to share at any given time. Their measured sentences revealed not only the breadth and depth of their study, but also the realization that what they did not know was just as broad and just as deep. To hear such a scholar admit, “I do not know” was perhaps as provocative as hearing him expound on a subject of which he was well versed. You do not just learn from such individuals, as much as you absorb from them.

Conversely, I have been in the presence of intellectual Lilliputians; small-minded, yappy little urchins whose self-worth was measured entirely by the volume of verbal effluvia he could spew. It is for good reason that it is said “quiet waters run deep” while babbling little brooks are shallow and quickly disappear in the heat of summer.

I would much rather spend 10 minutes in the presence of a scholar who can admit error or ignorance, as to spend a day in the presence of someone who proclaims to know everything about everything. I would much rather sit in the presence of a person who remains silent and yet teaches the wisdom of the ages, as to have to bear the presence of a person who cannot shut up yet says nothing.

Some ask, “How do you want to be remembered.” Perhaps no finer words could be spoken of a preacher than, “He was wise enough to know when to teach through words, and when to remain silent.”

I pray for such wisdom!

Author: Paul Smith

Paul Smith was born in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He holds the Bachelor of Science in Youth Ministry, Master of Biblical Studies and Master of Divinity, all from Abilene Christian University; and the Doctor of Ministry from Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. Paul's passion is in teaching and preaching the gospel. Beyond the study of the Bible, his main academic interest is in the life and theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. He is an unashamed mountain-goat, and longs to spend his time with his feet in a cold trout stream.

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